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PRP/Microneedling

Faculty: Jennifer Holman, MD

Dr. Holman began her presentation on platelet rich plasma (PRP) and microneedling through emphasizing her belief in the utilization of PAs in her practice as “best working as partners”. She reviewed the use of PRP dating back to the 1970s in medicine. The benefit of PRP is the 300+ active substances found in PRP which include numerous growth factors. Patients who seek treatments that are more “natural” are ideal for treatment with PRP as Dr. Holman stated “it doesn’t get more natural than your own stem cells”. While PRP has been used for numerous conditions including striae, tissue regeneration, scar revision and wound healing, it is most often used for the treatment of alopecia. All PRP is not the same and there are different yields based on the machine. Dr. Holman reports pure PRP is most ideal for dermatologic use. Classification of PRP is based on DEPA or dose of injected platelets, efficiency of production, purity and activation. PRP is often utilized in conjunction with microneedling.

Patients who seek treatments that are more “natural” are ideal for treatment with PRP as Dr. Holman stated “it doesn’t get more natural than your own stem cells”.

Next, Dr. Holman discussed microneedling, also known as collagen induction therapy. She described this as “slowing the aging game through activation”. Benefits of microneedling include decreased down time as well as a lower cost treatment when compared to more invasive cosmetic procedures. The mechanism of action of microneedling works through injury of the skin resulting in the release of cytokines causing tissue proliferation and remodeling. Microneedling recruits skin remodeling through the thousands of microchannels in the skin. Swelling is the most common side effect of microneedling though it is typically resolved within 24 hours. Dr. Holman reports microneedling has been successfully used for numerous conditions including melasma, acne scarring and decreasing pore size. She reports she particularly likes to use microneedling in her rosacea patients. Lastly, it was noted the effects of microneedling is cumulative.

The mechanism of action of microneedling works through injury of the skin resulting in the release of cytokines causing tissue proliferation and remodeling.

Byline: Sarah Patton, MSHS, PA-C
Posted: November 20, 2019




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