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Product Theater – Introducing a NEW Chemical Entity for the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Inflammatory Acne

Featuring Guest Faculty, Joshua Grosshandler, MD

For the afternoon product theater, Dr. Joshua Grosshandler reviewed acne and the new medication Seysara. Dr. Grosshandler reported he loves treating acne “because we can really make a difference in patient’s lives and self-confidence.” It has been recently realized inflammation is the key driver in the pathogenesis of acne. Oral antibiotics are typically utilized for the treatment of moderate to severe acne. The anti-inflammatory effect of antibiotics is best understood through inhibition of inflammatory cell migration and proliferation and proinflammatory mediators. With the rise in antibiotic resistance, it is best to use oral antibiotics for the least amount of time. Tetracyclines have been the most commonly prescribed antibiotics for acne since the 1950s. Seysara is the first new antibiotic for the treatment of acne in 40 years.

Seysara is the first new antibiotic for the treatment of acne in 40 years.

Seysara is Indicated for treatment of inflammatory lesions of non-nodular moderate to severe acne vulgaris in patients 9 years of age and older. It is a tetracycline class medication delivered in a new novel molecule. Seysara is a once daily medication and the dosing is weight based. One of the benefits of Seysara is a rapid onset of improvement with patients achieving up to a 30% decrease in inflammatory lesion count at 3 weeks. Average reduction in inflammatory count at 12 weeks is 50%. Seysara has a demonstrated safety profile with less than 2% of patients in any study arm having a significant treatment related event.

One of the benefits of Seysara is a rapid onset of improvement with patients achieving up to a 30% decrease in inflammatory lesion count at 3 weeks.

The most common adverse event with use of Seysara is nausea. It can be taken with or without food. As with all tetracycline class medications, warnings for Seysara includes CNS side effects, intracranial hypertension, photosensitivity, bacterial resistance, C. difficile associated diarrhea, teratogenic effects and bacterial superinfection. Lastly, Seysara should not be taken in pregnancy or in women who are trying to conceive.

 

Byline: Sarah Patton, MSHS, PA-C
Posted: June 8, 2019




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